So why should I care about a bad reputation, anyway?

I believe I’m a little late to the game when it comes to the Daily Prompts. I think I’ve spent most of my time on here reading other people’s (ah-mazing!) blogs and trying to figure out all the technical stuff when it comes to setting up my own. I swear, I think I’ve tried out every theme that is offered! Anyway, I like these blog ideas and maybe after starting with er, Day 17, I’ll go back and give them all a try.

As far as reputations go, I think I’ve had quite a few over the years. Some were well deserved, some not so much.

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Me (top left, sporting a fanny pack) with my mom and two of my sisters. Maybe the reason I was antisocial is because I was having too much fun looking at bugs, or moss, or whatever it is I’m so interested in.

Me (top left, sporting a fanny pack) with my mom and two of my sisters. Maybe the reason I was antisocial is because I was having too much fun looking at bugs, or moss, or whatever it is I’m so interested in.

The shy, antisocial freakshow: As a child at school I had the reputation for being too quiet. I was a good kid. Hey, I was class president in kindergarten. That was a pretty big deal to me then. I remember rushing home to tell my dad this good news. He was probably thinking, “My child is a nerd.” I had a close family with three sisters and we played together all the time. They were my friends. So when I started to go to school, I just had a hard time socializing. New people=scary. It wasn’t until about 2nd grade when I made my first best friend. She was outgoing and a nonstop chatterbox and just kind of helped me break out of my shell. I adored her. We were in the same class until 4th grade. Once we were separated, I found myself having a hard time making friends again. Let me tell you, 4th grade was a rough year for this kid. Going from my best friend at my side to back on my own was traumatizing for this introvert. It wasn’t until about 5th grade onward when I actually opened up and made groups of friends that I overcame my shyness. I don’t know what I did. I guess I just kind of grew out of it. Or more I just realized there are more people in this world than me and I’m going to have to deal with it.

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I’m on a new computer so I don’t have access to photos of me during my middle school years. (Thank God.) So in my place I’ll stick “sad robot” which I came across awhile ago and just thought he was the cutest. He’s close enough to me back then that he makes a pretty good replacement. (The sad part, I was far from a cutie back then.)

 

The brain: As a preteen I had the reputation of being smart. Which is a good thing. A very good thing. However, the other little hooligans in school made it out like it was a bad thing. I was never one of those “nerdy” kids, but I just kicked ass at all my schoolwork. If there was one thing I could go back and tell my younger self it would probably be to not care what these dumb kids say. It won’t matter in the long run. However, I did care and especially when one of my teachers in 7th grade stopped her introduction in the middle of the first day to call me out and ask me if I was smart. After my awkward “uhhh, how I am I supposed to answer that and why is she asking me this weird question in front of everyone?” stuttering moment, she told me she had to ask because I “look smart.” Thanks teacher. Maybe that was supposed to be a compliment, but it was like painting a huge target right across my back. Which did happen because I remember this group of bratty girls that sat behind me coming down hard on me ever since that day. They constantly whispered about me as they sat behind me, making fun of me. I’d like to note most of these girls either got pregnant, hooked on drugs, or dropped out by the time high school ended. Karma, ladies. At the time though, my young self hated it and I began to make bad grades on purpose. Kind of like Lindsay Lohan in “Mean Girls” except I didn’t do this for Aaron Samuels. I did this because of all the mean girls at school. Stupid, yes. But I was no longer “the smart girl” on the outside. Only on the inside.

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Here’s my bad self doing one of my most top notch evil accomplishments…climbing on a store roof in the middle of the night. They don’t call me The Troublemaker for nothing.

Here’s my bad self doing one of my most top notch evil accomplishments…climbing on a store roof in the middle of the night. They don’t call me The Troublemaker for nothing.

The troublemaker: In high school, I didn’t really fit into a certain clique, so I don’t think I had much of a reputation. I was just friends with anyone. By that time though, I guess I was growing out of my awkward dorky phase and I remember guys started to notice, “Hey, this chick is actually alright looking.” In fact, I got a lot of attention as I blossomed in high school. Still, I was use to all my female friends, so I was never good around guys. In fact, I was pretty awkward. About this time though, my mother and I were at odds so I began to get a reputation in my family as being the “angry, bad kid” who was always in trouble. I think out of all of my sisters, I was considered the black sheep. I do have anger issues, somewhat. I’m quick to get mad over little things and when you’re a teenager, it’s notoriously worse. So I was no angel. But in my defense, I also happen to have a very immature mother who got kicks out of making me loose it. She loved to probe me by calling me an “airhead,” “dumb blonde,” and make fun of my lack of skill when it came to first applying make up or trying to dress myself and just trying to fit in. I also had a goody two shoes snitch of a sister who always chimed into every argument on my mother’s side no matter what. I’m sure most of you have been there as an adolescent, so you know what I’m talking about. So as a teenager, where my family was concerned, I was the rebellious troublemaker. Although, let me add that I never tried drugs, smoked, had sex, or got drunk as a teenager. Yet, I was still considered “a bad kid.”

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Partying it up in Baton Rouge with one of my best friends (me being on the right). It was Halloween, hence the skanky last minute dark angel/fairy costumes. Just wanted to point out this wasn’t my usual attire.

 

The party girl turned accomplished student: In college, I think my early reputation might have been a little bit of a partier. (Is that a correct word?) I roomed with a wild child friend from high school who was breaking out of her strict parent’s Christian home and just wanted to be part of everything. (Not the girl pictured above.) I tagged a long to all the fraternity parties and night clubs (which killed my first college relationship – don’t get a boyfriend as soon as you go to college unless you’re serious) and really enjoyed it. From not being a party person in high school, college was a whole new thing to experience. Still, I wasn’t a hardcore partier. The only drug I ever tried was weed. The second half of college I was ready for commitment and began a four year relationship with a great guy. I also had switched from a theater major to a film major (there is a difference) and began to just excel at all my creative projects. I still wasn’t the best at my normal (science, math) classes, mainly because I didn’t care and also my mind was probably still slightly warped from my middle school years. However, in what I was passionate about, I was great. I became known in my film making and writing classes as being gifted and talented. Which felt wonderful. I think it was by the end of college I kind of came to my senses and realized from then on out it doesn’t matter what people think about you. You are who you are. Now if only I had realized that earlier so I could have had a stellar GPA all through school.

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I guess I have an okay reputation now. My friend bought me a Jack Skellington hat that night just for being me, so I must be doing something right.

 

Finally, a reputation that’s me: I think in my family I’m still considered the angry bad emo kid, but now everywhere else I’ve been told I’m one of the brightest, down to earth, funniest people they know and I’m just fine with that reputation. In fact, if I continue in life with that kind of reputation, I’ll be very satisfied.

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4 thoughts on “So why should I care about a bad reputation, anyway?

  1. Pingback: What is YOUR Online Reputation? | Cheri Speak

  2. Pingback: Daily Prompt: Blogger of Repute | Chronicles of an Anglo Swiss

  3. We stumbled upon your blog and you won us over with your anecdotes, wit, and clever writing (good grammar, and you get brownie points; add some tongue-in-cheek humor and well-placed sarcasm and we’re sold). We nominated your blog for a Liebster award. The way it works, according to the blog that nominated us, is that you have to answer ten questions the nominating blog comes up with and in turn nominate another blog. If you wan’t to participate, read our last post. The questions are all up there :)

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